News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

MAP kinase safeguards plants

By | March 4, 2002

MAP kinase signaling is involved in plant innate immunity, conferring resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

0 Comments

Shape of a chromodomain

By | March 4, 2002

The structure of the HP1 chromodomain shows how it recognizes methylated histone tails.

0 Comments

Cloned mice are obese

By | March 1, 2002

Cloning using somatic cells has potentially important clinical and therapeutic applications, but the long-term effects of cloning on the offspring of these animals remains unknown. In March Nature Medicine, Kellie Tamashiro and colleagues from University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA, show that cloned mice have an obese phenotype, but that this is not transmitted to their offspring.Tamashiro et al. examined cloned mice of different background strains (B6C3F1, B6D2F1) and used spec

0 Comments

Good taste

By | March 1, 2002

The ability to taste gives animals a means to assess the identity and quality of potential food substances. In an Advanced Online Publication from Nature, Greg Nelson and colleagues at the University of California at San Diego describe characterization of the mammalian amino-acid taste receptor (Nature 2002, DOI 10.1038/nature726).They employed an expression screening strategy, expressing putative G-protein-coupled receptors in human cells and assaying for stimulus-induced changes in intracellul

0 Comments

Telomeres and Fanconi's anemia

By | March 1, 2002

Telomere breakage and replicative shortening account for telomere shortening in Fanconi 's anemia.

0 Comments

1

By | February 28, 2002

Patients infected with HIV have highly variable CD8+ CTL responses despite the high number of circulating CD8+ T cells, an observation that remains poorly understood. In March Journal of Immunology Mohammed Garba and colleagues from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA, show that the failure of CD8+ T cell responses can be the result of an active HIV regulatory process mediated by secretion of TGF-β1, rather than the absence of CD8+ cells.Garba et al. used flow cytometric methods

0 Comments

Dodo genetics

By | February 28, 2002

The dodo (originally Didus ineptus and renamed Raphus cucullatus) is a mysterious, now extinct, bird that has been difficult to position in evolutionary trees. In the March 1 Science, Beth Shapiro and colleagues at the University of Oxford, UK, report a genetic analysis of the evolutionary history of the dodo (Science 2002, 295:1683).Shapiro et al. examined DNA sequences amplified from the mitochondrial genomes of 37 species of pigeons and doves, including the dodo and the another flightless bir

0 Comments

French revolution

By | February 28, 2002

Plans to elevate the status of France's biotechnology sector have won support from within the industry.

0 Comments

Extracellular DNA

By | February 27, 2002

Bacteria can organize into structured communities, called biofilms, that protect them from antibiotics and from immune attack by the host. The biofilms are embedded in a matrix containing a complex mixture of macromolecules including exopolysaccharides and proteins. In the February 22 Science, Cynthia Whitchurch and colleagues reported that extracellular DNA is a major component of the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Science 2002, 295:1487).Whitchurch et al. demonstrated that adding DNase I

0 Comments

Long-term risks of chemotherapy

By | February 27, 2002

Chemotherapy can generate new cancerous growths and may carry significant cardiovascular risks.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body
    Daily News How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

    Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

  2. That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute
    Daily News That Other CRISPR Patent Dispute

    The Broad Institute and Rockefeller University disagree over which scientists should be named as inventors on certain patents involving the gene-editing technology.

  3. Neurons Use Virus-Like Proteins to Transmit Information
  4. EPO Revokes Broad’s CRISPR Patent
    The Nutshell EPO Revokes Broad’s CRISPR Patent

    Shortly after ruling out the earliest priority dates on a foundational patent for CRISPR gene-editing technology, the European Patent Office rescinded the patent entirely—and more are likely to follow.

AAAS