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French Scientists Say Little; The French Press, Too Much

By | September 5, 1988

PARIS-- In a country where thousands of physicians practics ho- meopathy the Beneviste affair has generated widespread publicity, much of it favorable to the French scientist. Paris Match magazine, for example acclaimed the initial paper about the alleged memory of water as a stupendous breakthrough, but did not mention Nature's subsequent investigation. The newspaper Le Point reported with tongue not in cheek, rumor that several Nobel Prize-winning physicists met in Bermuda, somewhere near

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Funding Briefs

September 5, 1988

The Kresge Foundation, one of the dozen largest private foundations in the U.S., is well known for its financial support of nonscience-related construction and renovation. And indeed, over the years it has been instrumental in funding some very flashy libraries and gyms. However the foundation has always been open to science-related proposals as well, and earlier this year it offered to fund equipment as well as buildings. (See The Scientist, June 13, page 23.) According to program officer G

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Government Briefs

September 5, 1988

Yale physicist D. Allan Bromley, already a member of the low-profile White House Science Council, will soon be wearing a second, more visible Washington science policy hat. On July 25, President Reagan announced Bromley’s nomination to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF. Staffers at each body say they foresee no conflicts between the two positions, adding that Bromley’s most serious problem may be finding sufficient time to serve on each panel. Bromley is part of Vice

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Grappling With Galaxies: Basic Questions Persist

By | September 5, 1988

After years of passivity, the astronomy community is protesting telescope closings, cramped quarters, and scanty maintenance Our understanding of galaxies is at a primitive level, and we are still perplexed by basic questions. For instance: 1. Why do things such as galaxies exist at all, with their observed characteristic dimensions—typically 10^11 stars within radii of about 10^4 parsecs? 2. What is the dark matter that constitutes so large a part of galaxies?We know that more than 9O

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Hot Papers

September 5, 1988

The articles listed below—all less than a year old—have received a substantially greater number of citations than others of the same type and vintage. A citation-backing algorithm of the Institute for Scientific Information has Identified these articles. W.S. Argraves, S. Suzuki, H. Arai, K Thompson, M.D. Pierschbacher, E. Ruoslahti, “Amino acid sequence of the human fibronectin receptor,” Journal of Cell Biology, 105(3), 1183-90, September 1987. H.M. Cherwinski,

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Keith Davies has made Chemical Design a world leader in molecular modeling LONDON—By now we’ve all seen the numbers and heard the gloomy forecasts. Science in the United Kingdom is suffering from a dearth of funding, incentives, and political clout. The lack of commitment to R&D on the part of both the private and public sectors in Britain has sparked an alarming emigration of scientists and high-tech entrepreneurs. But for every rule there is an exception, and Keith Davies is

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{WantNoCacheVal} How A Research Proposal Moves Through NIH When a grant proposal arrives at NIH's, Bethesda. Md., headquarters it is routed directly to the agency's Division of Research Grants. There, one of a dozen or so "referral officers" identifies the scientific field to the most appropriate of the agency's 93 standing commit- tees review to the so-called "study sections." A study section consists of from 14 to 20 scientists representing a widerange of specialties: The Surgery, Anesthesi

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How Bill Hewlett And I Wound Up In A Palo Alto Garage

By | September 5, 1988

How Bill Hewlett And I Wound Up In A Palo Alto Garage Palo Alto Garage AUTHOR:DAVID PACKARD Date: September 05, 1988 [Ed. note: In January 1939, five years after he graduated from Stanford, David Packard cofounded Hewlett-Packard Co. with former classmate William Hewlett. The two friends’ original partnership arrangement was so informal that neither man is sure what date it was signed. And like many new companies, Hewlett-Packard teetered on the brink of financial disaster. During the fir

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Industry Briefs

September 5, 1988

Despite recent corporate shake-ups at Philadelphia’s Smith Kline & French Laboratories, the R&D scientists will remain unscathed, according to the company. “We will invest more dollars in R&D in 1989 than we did in 1988,” Viewed Henry Wendt, SmithKline Beckman chairman and chief executive officer, when the resignation of Stanley T. Crooke, head of R&D, was announced August 10. The company—which employs 2,100 research personnel—has an R&D budget this year of $250

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Inside Bell Labs: Excitement On The Bench; Concern on High

By | September 5, 1988

Inside Bell Labs: Excitement On The Bench; Concern On High AUTHOR: SHARON BEGLEY Date: September 05, 1988 Researchers have never felt freer, but some lab heads and a prominent former manager see major changes since divestiture The stockholder was annoyed. Why, he demanded, was AT&T paying Thomas Gradel, a middle-aged scientist, to tromp around the Jungles of Brazil studying ants, when the dollars could be better used to fatten up Bell’s notoriously meager dividends? The irate stoc

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