Magazine

Most Recent

image: 2017 Life Science Salary Survey

2017 Life Science Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2017

Industry professionals make more than academic researchers, but for professors, it may not be about the money.

0 Comments

image: Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

By , , and | November 1, 2017

No two neurons are alike. What does that mean for brain function?

1 Comment

image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

1 Comment

Researchers explore genetic engineering to produce super-tough fibers.

1 Comment

Some researchers suggest that providing experimental animals with more-natural living conditions not only benefits the organisms, but the data they generate as well.

1 Comment

image: Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

By | October 1, 2017

French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat took on many roles over the course of his life, including physician and scientist.

0 Comments

Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

0 Comments

image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By | October 1, 2017

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Damage Patroller

Damage Patroller

By | October 1, 2017

Stephen Elledge has built a career studying how eukaryotic cells maintain genomic integrity.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  3. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  4. Putative Gay Genes Identified, Questioned
    The Nutshell Putative Gay Genes Identified, Questioned

    A genomic interrogation of homosexuality turns up speculative links between genetic elements and sexual orientation, but researchers say the study is too small to be significant. 

FreeShip