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image: Mapping Brain Proteins

Mapping Brain Proteins

By Devika G. Bansal | February 1, 2018

Researchers are using souped-up mass spectrometry to localize proteins within brain cells.

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image: Plant Cell Walls Can Control Growth in the Dark

Plant Cell Walls Can Control Growth in the Dark

By Kerry Grens | February 1, 2018

To maintain an energy-saving growth strategy in the absence of light, seedlings need signals generated by pectin in their cell walls.

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image: Planting Independence: A Profile of Katayoon Dehesh

Planting Independence: A Profile of Katayoon Dehesh

By Anna Azvolinsky | February 1, 2018

After a harrowing escape from Iran, Dehesh never shied away from difficult choices to pursue a career in plant biology.

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image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.

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image: Researchers Cryopreserve Coral Sperm

Researchers Cryopreserve Coral Sperm

By Catherine Offord | February 1, 2018

A project aims to preserve samples of the climate change–vulnerable animals for future restoration.

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Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.

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image: Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain Science

Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain Science

By Ashley Yeager | February 1, 2018

New technology could open doors for researchers studying animals’ most complex organ.

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image: War Dance of the Honeybee

War Dance of the Honeybee

By Karl Gruber | February 1, 2018

One species has developed a novel waggle to warn about invading wasps.

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image: How Manipulating the Plant Microbiome Could Improve Agriculture

How Manipulating the Plant Microbiome Could Improve Agriculture

By Davide Bulgarelli | February 1, 2018

It has become increasingly evident that, like animals, plants are not autonomous organisms but rather are populated by a cornucopia of diverse microorganisms.

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image: Next-Generation Exoskeletons Help Patients Move

Next-Generation Exoskeletons Help Patients Move

By Karen Weintraub | February 1, 2018

A robot’s gentle nudge could add just the right amount of force to improve walking for patients with mobility-impairing ailments such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke.  

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