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By | October 17, 1988

Traditional high-tech industry rivals IBM and AT&T compete in many spheres—from selling personal computers to garnering Nobel Prizes. But an area of particular fascination for scientists is their ongoing competition in basic and applied research. In 1987, the two titans again went head-to-head. They both, for example, went all out in pursuing high-temperature superconducting ceramic oxides and new technology leading to improved semiconductors. But there were significant differ- ences in

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Tools Briefs

October 17, 1988

By building a tiny “cityscape” on a chip of gallium arsenide, with crystal “skyscrapers” less thanone ten-thousandth of an inch high, Cornell University scientists have developed a simple method to improve electronic devices based on gallium arsenide (GaAs). As the basis for high-speed transistors, microprocessors, and tiny solid-state lasers, gallium arsenide outperforms silicon. However, its use has been limited by the number of defects plaguing the sandwich-like devic

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New York also ranked first in similar surveys taken in 1967 and 1977. Since New York boasts the largest population of any U.S. city, one might justifiably expect it to rank at the top of any such list; it is noteworthy that, despite growth in other major metropolises, New York’s great concentration of scientists at its numerous universities and medical centers has kept it on top for at least 20 years. However, when measured in terms of the growth rate of number of publishing scientists

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University Briefs

October 17, 1988

By not charging corporate and government clients for the indirect costs of contract research, British universities have been effectively subsidizing the research. (The Scientist, May 30, page 5). This practice, says a recent report from the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals, must stop. The report contains guidelines that would add more than $100 million to the $500 million annually that universities now charge for research. The guidelines are not mandatory, but universities are under

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I wonder if what I’ve noticed happening to the faculty of United States medical schools applies equally to other segments of the “research university.” Put simply, we are creating two faculties: one devoted to bringing in research grants and publishing as many papers as possible, and the other relegated to handling the teaching load. The separation is not complete, but it is rapidly becoming so, and the vigor of the latter group is not increasing. Many professors will retire in

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Where Science, Technology, And Profit Motive Meet

By | October 17, 1988

SCIENCE AND CORPORATE STRATEGY: Du Pont R&D, 1902-1980 David A. Hounshell and John Kenly Smith, Jr. Cambridge University Press; New York 731 pages; $34.50 Science, married to technology under the auspices of the corporate industrial research laboratory, has played a central role in the transformation of the U.S. economy in the 20th century. Yet, until the present book, there has never been a detailed, scholarly study of the history of a major U.S. industrial research program covering more tha

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A Glossary Of Leasing Terms

October 3, 1988

{WantNoCacheVal} A Glossary Of Leasing Terms The American Association of Equipment Lessors, based in Arlington, é produces several publications to help potential lessees understand the jargon associated with this complicated business. This glossary of lease-related terms is excerpted from “Equipment Leasing Is Good Business Here’s Why.” Capital Lease A type of lease classified and accounted for by a lessee as a purchase and by the lessor as a sale or a financing, if it m

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All Calm in Buffalo

By | October 3, 1988

In the Government Briefs section of the May16 issue of The Scientist (page 5), an article entitled "Finding Fault With Buffalo" made reference to "financial tremors" that are supposedly "running through" the NSF-funded National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (NCEER) at the State University of New York, Buffalo. The piece went on to state that the center is "having trouble keeping its part of the agreement" and that "the $25 million, five-year federal grant called for an annual $5

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Also Notable

October 3, 1988

U.S.A.: Companies, Data And Analysis Mark Dibner; Stockton Press; New York 352 pages; $175 Neurobiologist Mark Dibner from the North Carolina Biotechnology Center has assembled a wealth of information on 360 U.S. biotechnology companies. The guide includes sections on their financing, personnel, patents, partnerships, R&D budgets, and areas of interest. ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY Council on Health Care Technology; National Academy Press; Washington; 592 pages; $250 Put out by an arm of the Inst

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Anthropologist Struggles To Save A Warrior Tribe

By | October 3, 1988

The Yanomamö are among the most violent people ever studied, yet Napoleon Chagnon is battling to protect them from the likes of us SANTA BARBARA, CALIF.—When a Yanomamö headman complained to Napoleon Chagnon that a missionary was intimidating the village’s shamans, the feisty anthropologist decided to remove his mantle of scientific detachment and take action. The next time the missionary came rushing into the village center to stop the dancing, Living with a tribe

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