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Funding Briefs

September 19, 1988

After seven years of acting as a center for researchers from other institutions, the Neurosciences Institute will add in-house research to its current programs. An independent organization located on the campus of Rockefeller University in New York, the institute works to encourage interdisciplinary exchange of information in neuroscience. Under director Gerald M. Edelman, the institute hosts small conferences and workshops, which do not follow the usual paper-and-slides format but which encoura

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Getting Science Papers Published: Where It's Easy, Where It's Not

By | September 19, 1988

Chemists, astronomers, or physicists looking to publish in one of their discipline's scholarly journals stand a far better chance of having their submissions accepted first time around than do anthropologists, psychologists, or sociologists. This conclusion combs from independently undertaken studies reported on earlier this year, which found that, in general, journals dedicated to physical sciences have markedly lower rejection rates than do publications geared toward the social sciences. One o

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Going After Gravity: How A High-Risk Project Got Funded

By | September 19, 1988

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.—If Rainer Weiss doesn't reach his goal of staring God in the eye—or at least gazing back to the first moment of creation—it won't be for lack of trying. Over the past 16 years, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology physicist has appeared before a host of committees, flitted between coasts on red-eye flights to meet with collaborators, and even endured what some call a scientific version of a shotgun wedding with rival physicists at Caltech. For the pipe-smo

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Government Briefs

September 19, 1988

The Carnegie Corp. is pulling out all the stops for its planned 1991 report on the application of science and technology to government for the benefit of society. Earlier this year, the philanthropic organization formed a commission to prepare the sweeping report, loading it with such luminaries as Joshua Lederberg, Jerome Weisner, Bobby lnman, John Brademas, Donald Kennedy, and Jimmy Carter. But even that star-studded cast apparently wasn't luminous enough. Now, the new commission has taken the

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Hillman Vindicated?

By | September 19, 1988

The Scientist is enjoyable reading not only because of the range of stories you cover, but mainly because you are willing to address controversial subjects. I was especially interested in the July 25 article about Professor Hillman and his concern over images generated by electron microscopy. While Dr. Hillman may have alienated himself from some of the scientific community, I feel he has valid concerns over the creation of artifacts in conventional electron microscopy. Of note here is the work

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Hillman's Response

By | September 19, 1988

I should like to comment briefly on Richard Stevenson's article on my "heresies" (The Scientist, July 25, 1988, page 5). Firstly, on January 1, 1978 in the columns of one of the best known British newspapers, I invited the senior officers of the Royal Microscopial Society, or anyone who agreed with their "orthodox" views on cell structure, to a public debate anywhere in the world at any mutually convenient time. I have repeated this invitation in several publications and at many lectures. Only o

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Hot Papers

September 19, 1988

A.G. Daigleish, B.J. Thomsc T.C. Chanh, M. Malkovsky, R.C. Kennedy, "Neutralisati of HIV isolates by antiidiotypic antibodies which mimic the T4 (CD4) epitope: a potential AIDS vaccine," The Lancet, 11(8567), 1047-50, 7 November 1987. M. Kozak, "An analysis of 5 noncoding sequences from 699 vertebrate messenger RNAs," Nucleic Acids Research, 15 (20), 8125-48, 26 October 1987. M. Petkovich, N.J. Brand, A. Krust, P. Chambon, "A human retinoic acid receptor which belongs to the family of nuclear re

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How To Talk Turkey With The Chairman

By | September 19, 1988

Let's say you're a new Ph.D. and you've got your heart set on becoming an assistant professor in a university science department. And let's say you've survived the selection procedure by the search committee at the school you wish to join. As one of, say, the top three candidates for an assistant professorship, you'll soon have to have a negotiating session with the chairman—who by this time either wants you, needs you, or is unable to live without you. As a department chairman, I've had m

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Industry Briefs

September 19, 1988

Paul Chu's superconductor research at the University of Houston will act as a "multiplier" to Du Pont's own efforts, senior vice president Al MacLachlan said after Du Pont announced a multimillion dollar deal with Houston on August 23. Under the agreement, which took a year to negotiate, Du Pont made an initial payment of $1.5 million to the university and will fork over an additional $1.5 million upon issuance of a patent to Chu covering the class of 1-2-3 superconducting compounds (YBa2Cu3O7).

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Known For Its Good Chemistry, Du Pont Goes Multidisciplinary

By | September 19, 1988

WILMINGTON, DEL.—When Du Pont executives first tried to recruit Mark Pearson back in 1982, he didn't take them seriously. After all, he reasoned, with no corporate history of ground-breaking work in molecular biology, what would the company do with a director of one of the National Cancer Institute's molecular biology laboratories? "Besides," he adds, "they were a chemical company." Not any longer. Within the past five years Du Pont has embarked upon new ventures in electronics, imaging, a

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