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Articles Alert

September 5, 1988

The Scientist has asked a group of experts to periodically comment upon recent articles that they have found noteworthy. Their selections, presented here in every issue, are neither endorsements of content nor the result of systematic searching. Rather, they are personal choices of articles they believe the scientific community as a whole may also find interesting. Reprint. of any artieles cited here may be ordered through The Genuine Article, 5501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104, or by tel

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Articles Alert

September 5, 1988

The Scientist has asked a group of experts to periodically comment upon recent articles that they have found noteworthy. Their selections, presented here in every issue, are neither endorsements of content nor the result of systematic searching. Rather, they are personal choices of articles they believe the scientific community as a whole may also find interesting. Reprint. of any artieles cited here may be ordered through The Genuine Article, 5501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104, or by tel

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Association Briefs

September 5, 1988

Although it claims that it has not taken a stand against dissection and vivisection, the National Association of Biology Teachers has passed a resolution that supports alternatives to animal research and pledges to recommend materials that teachers can use in place of animals. The resolution, passed unanimously by the association’s eight-member board, is in response to increased sensitivity toward animal-rights issues that has emerged during the past four years or so, says education dir

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Ben Franklin Partnership Sets A New Funding Pace

By | September 5, 1988

Only five years old, Pennsylvania’s Ben Franklin Partnership Fund, a statewide technology-transfer program, has already become a model for states that want to encourage scientists and engineers to develop the commercial potential of their research. Since its founding, the Partnership’s support of collaboration between small bus inesses and academic scientists has produced a wide range of results, including: * Products to detect drugs in saliva " SO2 and HCI sensors for use

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Biotech Patent Bottleneck Harms Makers Of Better Mousetraps AUTHOR:RON COWEN Date: September 05, 1988 While the U.S. Patent Office fiddles, small firms lacking earnings records may be losing potential investors WASHINGTON—Chemist George Rathman won’t soon forget July 1, 1987, the day that the worth of his company’s stock dropped $10 million in six hours. President and CEO of Aragen Inc., an eight-year-old biotechnology firm in Thou- sand Oaks, Calif., Rathmann calls the ex

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Chemistry At 5 U.K. Universities: 15-Year Trends

By | September 5, 1988

The British government’s scheme for “rationalizing” support for science, begun last year with an eval nation of earth science departments, has sparked considerable controversy. Having suffered major cuts in 1981, many U.K. university scientists are chilled by the prospect of further reductions for those departments that receive low performance ratings. Next to be scrutinized are departments of chemistry and physics. The Institute for Scientific Information recently undert

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Computer Product Briefs

September 5, 1988

Scientists who have joined the ranks of secretaries, journalists, data processors, and others who spend most of the day glued to a VDT screen, take note. Last month James Sheedy, chief of the University of California, Berkeley’s Video Display Terminal Eye Clinic, reported that an eye-focusing problem in people in their 20s and 30s was the number one problem in clinical studies of 153 patients. The study did not prove a causal relationship between regular VDT use and difficulty with eye

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Contrary to Nature?

By | September 5, 1988

Many scientists cannot understand why the episode was handled as it was—if not for the sensation of it all.

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Criticism Builds Over Nature Investigation

By | September 5, 1988

Criticism Builds Over Nature Investigation AUTHOR:BERNARD DIXON Date: September 05, 1988 There may be no solution that can’t be diluted, but this is one controversy that won’t die out; Maddox vs. Benveniste LONDON--La'affaire Benveniste has been this summer’s, best soap opera—another thrilling episode in “As the World of Science Thins.” Who could have imagined that Jacques Benveniste, a scientist at a prestigious French government laboratory would claim to

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Entrepreneur Briefs

September 5, 1988

When organic chemist Anne B. Sayigh and Harvard MBA Josef von Rickenbach formed Parexel International Corp. in 1982, they weren’t the only entrepreneurs who stood to benefit. Their Cambridge, Mass., firm escorts other companies—particularly biotechs—through the maze of FDA regulations that govern the research and production of new health products. In addition to designing, managing, and finding suitable sites for clinical trials, Parexel publishes the U.S. Regulatory Report

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