Magazine

Most Recent

National Lab Briefs

September 5, 1988

A flap over photographs has made the Applied Physics Lab at Johns Hopkins University the target of a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. The suit charges that staff photographer Terry Corbett was illegally fired in August 1987 after he refused to take pictures of demonstrators protesting the lab’s work on nuclear weapons. ACLU lawyer Charles Becker contends that the rights of demonstrators were violated when the Defense Department-funded lab gave pictures of the demonst

0 Comments

New Chemistry Periodical Is Publishing On Diskette

By | September 5, 1988

Volume one, number one, of the first scientific journal to be simultaneously published in hard copy and on computer diskette has been released by Tetrahedron Publications, a division of Pergamon Press. Called Tetrahedron Computer Methodology—or TCM— and touting itself as “the international electronic journal for rapid publication of original research in computer chemistry,” the new publication also is the first chemical journal to offer scientific research reports that

0 Comments

NEW PRODUCTS

September 5, 1988

SYRINGELESS FILTERS Suitable for filtration of tissue culture media and laboratory buffers, Autovial syringeless filters are available to biological researchers in a .2 um pore size in both sterile and nonsterile forms. The devices consist of a prefilter, a membrane filter, and a syringe in one disposable unit. Membrane options include PVDF, Nylon66, or PTFE. Each ifitration unit can filter as much as 12 ml of sample. Prices depend on the quantity purchased and range from $1.10 to $2.10 per n

0 Comments

New Rule Hikes Pay Of Some NSF Scientists

By | September 5, 1988

WASHINGTON—Starting next month, NSF will be allowed to pay up to $95,000 to scientists accepting temporary positions in Washington. The new rule represents a boost of $17,500 in the federal pay ceiling created last December by Congress. But the higher cap comes at a price—a new ceiling on salaries for thousands of NSF grantees. That annual ceiling has also been set at $95,000, although typically NSF funds only the summer salaries of university scientists. The ceiling will be appl

0 Comments

Physics Dream Machine Is Imperiled

By | September 5, 1988

Technical problems plague Stanford’s Linear Collider, threatening its ability to produce breakthroughs in particle physics Expectations were running high. For months, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), an innovative particle accelerator nearing completion at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Facility (SLAC) in Palo Alto, Calif. had been preparing for its debut. This was the machine that would mint a million Z0 particles a year. Close study of the Z0—it’s mass, for example̵

0 Comments

“Man’s moral sense has not kept pace with his scientific knowledge.” “Humans have discovered secrets hitherto kept hidden, but not learned to use them well.” In the early 1950s, it was good sport for cliché collectors to count the number of times a week they heard assertions of this sort. The threatening science was nuclear physics, and the shock of Hiroshima was still producing understandable moral queasiness. What we now call life sciences were thought

0 Comments

Science Grants

September 5, 1988

Below is a list of notable grants recently awarded In the scIences—large fedreal grants as well as awards of all sizes from private foundations. The individual cited with each entry Is the project’s principal Investigator. Olfactory and neuroendocrine functions. $1.9 million over seven years from the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke to Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury Mass.: F. Macrides Resistance to anticancer d

0 Comments

Science Grants

September 5, 1988

Below is a list of notable grants recently awarded In the scIences—large fedreal grants as well as awards of all sizes from private foundations. The individual cited with each entry Is the project’s principal Investigator. Olfactory and neuroendocrine functions. $1.9 million over seven years from the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke to Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury Mass.: F. Macrides Resistance to anticancer d

0 Comments

Scientists, Face It! Science And Religion Are Incompatible

By | September 5, 1988

The highly visible conflict between evolutionary biology and creationism has stimulated much com- mentary in the scientific press about the relationship between science and religion. The Scientist Science, Nature, and many other journals have given much space to tbe issue. Even the National Academy of Sciences has issued a statement on science and religion. A clear consensus emerges from this outpouring of literature. Scientists vigorously claim that no conflict exists between science and 

0 Comments

Tools Aim To Ease Burden Of Do-It-Yourself Programming

By | September 5, 1988

Most people working with personal computers don’t have degrees in computer science and don’t write their own programs. But in the population of people who do program, scientists make up a large percentage. Off-the-shelf software often doesn’t provide just what laboratory scientists are looking for therefore, many of them tinker with altering these store-bought packages or develop their own. If you do a little programming on an IBM PC, you should know that some reasonably pri

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy
  2. Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells
  3. Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech