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March 21, 1988

People on the Private Side I set up the [National Cancer Institute’s biological response modification program beginning in 1980, and I left in February of 1984, and during that time I actually was trying to get more private involvement, to get a closer interface with the biotechnology industry, to get rotating scientists in from outside to try to open up and liberalize some of the viewpoints within the N.C.I. system.... They almost totally rejected it. It was a real closed shop in ter

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Teaching After Science Careers

By | March 21, 1988

Sixty-year-old Donald G. Simpson, a retired air force lieutenant colonel, says he has a lot to offer the students in his science classes at Sanderson High School in Raleigh, N.C. “I know what to expect from the students because I’ve raised my own family. I think those school teachers who are kids themselves can’t understand their students as well as I can.” Fifty-seven-year-old Daniel Trollinger, a chemist at General Electric in Columbia, Md., is in the process of get

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The Crisis in Soviet Computer Science

By | March 21, 1988

During my recent stay in Moscow I was told several different variations on the following anecdote. Japanese experts were invited to assess the state of Soviet electronics and computer technology, and to tell their hosts how long it would take for the Soviet Union to catch up to Japan. “We thought you were behind us 15 or 20 years,” the Japanese experts responded, “But now we have come to the conclusion that it is forever.” A professor in Moscow told me that in the 194

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Last year the world of science celebrated the 300th anniversary of Isaac Newton’s Principia. Trinity College, Cambridge (UK) celebrated the event with a Newton Tercentenary Conference last summer. One result of the conference is the book 300 Years of Gravitation (Cambridge University Press, 1988), edited by Stephen Hawking and Werner Israel. The book contains 16 review papers by leading researchers in cosmology, relativity and particle physics. In his pref- ace to the book, excerpted bel

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Two More for the World Sci-Tech Series

By | March 21, 1988

Reviews Two More for the World Sci-Tech Series AUTHOR:BERNARD DIXON Date: March 21, 1988 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE USSR Longman Guide to World Science and Technology, vol. 6. Michael J. Beny, ed. Longman, Essex, UK, 1988. 405 pp. £63. Distributed in the U.S. and Canada by Gale Research Co., Detroit. $95. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN FRANCE AND BELGIUM Longman Guide to World Science and Technology, vol. 7. E. Walter Kellerman Longman, Essex, UK, 1988. 131 pp. £63. Distributed in the

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Wanted: Bigger Slice for Biomedicine

By | March 21, 1988

WASHINGTON—There are two ways for biomedical research to receive more federal funds: from new money generated by raising taxes, or through a larger share of the existing budget. While the biomedical commnunity as a whole is just beginning to tackle the problem, one group—the American Federation for Clinical Researchers—has already decided that biomedical research should receive a larger slice of the current pie at the expense of military research. On March 3 the New Jersey-

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'A Project Justified by Its Public Relations Value'

By | March 7, 1988

The genome. project... seems a ploy to raise money, a project justified by its public relations value, not its scientific value... We stand now at a moment of great opportunity. We have, a low-resolution map of much of the human genome and it is sure to improve. We have the skills to develop clone banks, high-resolution maps and rapid sequencing techniques. We can do what we have always done: each of us can apply these techniques as we see fit. We can distribute our efforts over various exper

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The 1988 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science confirmed one long.standing suspicion about the association: there’s no staff meteorologist. After subjecting participants to subzero cold and Lake Michigan’s 15-foot waves at last year’s bash in Chicago. AAAS this year decided to take on a howling storm that dropped a foot of snow on Boston. Nevertheless, the SCIENTIST's staffers overcame a closed Logan Airport to bring you the following report

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Ban Doctorates 'By the Pound'

By | March 7, 1988

Alongside triviality, unoriginality and, nowadays, dishonesty, one attribute for which journal editors are particularly vigilant in papers is obesity. Some research reports are, of course, necessarily bulky documents. This is especially true in fields such as high energy physics, where a collaboration of several dozen physicists and machine staff may be necessary to describe the design, outcome and analysis of experiments that take many months. At the other end of the scale, few if any worthwh

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Campaign ' 88

March 7, 1988

Michael Dukakis Governor of Massachusetts since 1982 and from 1974 to 1978. When U.S. presidential candidates take to the stump, science and technology policy is not among the principal topics they address. Press them about specific proposals-whether they would reinstitute the President's Science Advisory Committee, for example, or how they would pay for a space station or for sequencing the human genome-and many veer off into abstractions. While they may be more comfortable talking abou

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