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NY med school stops teaching with dogs

By | November 27, 2007

New York Medical College in Valhalla announced yesterday that it will no longer use live dogs in physiology classrooms. According to linkurl:The Chronicle of Higher Education,;http://chronicle.com/news/article/3495/new-york-medical-college-will-halt-use-of-dogs-in-labs the school has come under fire from community groups and politicians for being the last medical college in the state to use live animals for teaching purposes. Only 11 medical schools around the country still use animals for cla

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YouTube for BioMed Central

By | November 27, 2007

Videos are on the rise in science publishing, as we linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53500/ in August. On Friday, BioMed Central, sister company to The Scientist, joined the video crew with the linkurl:launch;http://blogs.openaccesscentral.com/blogs/bmcblog/entry/biomed_central_youtube_channel_debuts of its YouTube channel. Unlike efforts such as the video methods journal, JoVE, the 45 videos hosted on the channel so far consist of authors and editors talking about thei

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EU pushes for open access research

By | November 26, 2007

The Council of the European Union released linkurl:recommendations;http://www.consilium.europa.eu/ueDocs/cms_Data/docs/pressData/en/intm/97236.pdf on Friday (November 23) encouraging member states to study open access, but open access advocates are calling this a weak approach. The plan invites member states to support experiments in linkurl:various open access plans,;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53781/ including a delayed open access plan; support research on how scientific inf

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Gene therapy trial set to resume

By | November 26, 2007

The US Food and Drug Administration is allowing a controversial gene therapy trial to linkurl:resume,;http://ir.targen.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=84981&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1080820&highlight= after the trial was linkurl:halted;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53453/ when a 36-year-old participant died in July. The therapy, developed by Seattle based company Targeted Genetics, seeks to treat inflammatory arthritis, and is delivered via an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector through an injecti

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UK foot and mouth lab leaks again

By | November 26, 2007

A Surrey, UK, lab thought to be the linkurl:source;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53474/ of a foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in August again ran afoul of biosafety practices last week, when a leaking valve likely released live FMD virus into a contained drainage system. Merial, a company on the site that makes FMD vaccine, had been banned from using live virus after the August outbreak, but the government restored its license to work with FMD earlier this month when biosafety

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Academic publishers make open access deal

By | November 21, 2007

The fifth-largest academic journal publisher, SAGE, yesterday (November 20) announced an agreement with linkurl:open access;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/home/53781/ science and medicine publisher, Hindawi, to launch a new series of open access journals, the Chronicle of Higher Education linkurl:reports.;http://chronicle.com/news/article/3472/journal-publisher-goes-for-open-access Publication will be funded by author charges, using a linkurl:gold open access;https://www.the-scientist.com/

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Pharma reaches out for ghostwriter

By | November 21, 2007

Earlier this week, The Scientist linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53869/ on a trial comparing the efficacy of a hypertension drug, nebivolol, in African American and white American patients. It seems that Forest Laboratories, the drug's manufacturer, is making all kinds of comparisons for marketing purposes, and resorting to some questionable practices to do so. The Wall Street Journal Health Blog linkurl:reports;http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2007/11/21/odd-ghostwriting-off

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Judge throws out libel suit against scientist

By | November 20, 2007

A Los Angeles Superior Court judge threw out a linkurl:defamation;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53709/ suit today (November 20) filed by a Korean fertility researcher against a scientist who wrote an opinion piece criticizing his work. Judge James Dunn upheld a motion filed by the defendant, Bruce Flamm of the University of California,Irvine. Flamm's motion claimed that the lawsuit sought to stifle Flamm's criticism of Kwang Yul linkurl:Cha's;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/dis

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Medical group threatens to sue journal

By | November 20, 2007

A professional medical association has threatened to sue a scientific journal over an linkurl:article;http://www.ijoeh.com/pfds/IJOEH_1304_LaDou02.pdf accusing the group of pandering to industry. The article was published in the most recent issue of the __International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health__ (__IJOEH__), and it claims that members of the linkurl:American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine;http://www.acoem.org/ (ACOEM) have "deeply embedded" conflicts

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Two teams reprogram skin cells for pluripotency

By | November 20, 2007

Two studies published today report that human somatic cells can be reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that resembles human embryonic stem cells. As reported in linkurl:Cell;http://images.cell.com/images/Edimages/Cell/IEPs/3661.pdf , Shinya Yamanaka's group from Kyoto University linkurl:reprogrammed;https://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/24307/ adult human skin cells with four transcription factors to make them display human embryonic stem cell pluripotency. linkurl:Last year;http://www.n

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