The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

Most Recent

New chief for UK medical research?

By | September 13, 2007

According to a linkurl:news report;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v449/n7159/full/449121a.html in today's Nature, Leszek Borysiewicz, a vaccinologist and deputy rector at Imperial College London, has been selected to become the chief executive of the UK Medical Research Council. Colin Blakemore, who has held the post since 2003, linkurl:plans;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/52932/ to step down at the end of this month. The changeover comes amidst a period of turbulence at the age

0 Comments

Going anti-anti open access

By | September 12, 2007

The Association of American Publishers' campaign against open access has angered one member of an AAP division so much that he has resigned, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education. James D. Jordan, president and director of Columbia University Press, linkurl:told;http://chronicle.com/news/article/3009/university-press-leader-quit-publishers-panel-over-anti-open-access-campaign The Chronicle yesterday that he had resigned from the Executive Council of the AAP's Professional and S

0 Comments

NIH and NASA firm up space plans

By | September 12, 2007

In July, The Scientist linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53389/ on plans for a collaboration between NASA and NIH to conduct life science experiments aboard the International Space Station. Those plans, it seems, are taking off, with the two agencies holding a public signing at the Capitol tomorrow (Sept. 12) of a memorandum sealing the deal. The linkurl:release;http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2007/od-10.htm from NIH does not specify projects for the collaboration, sayi

0 Comments

Elsevier's open access plan: Advertisers pay

By | September 10, 2007

The New York Times linkurl:reports today;http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/10/business/media/10journal.html?ref=business that scientific and medical publisher Reed-Elsevier, which publishes 400 journals, has introduced ''a Web portal, linkurl:www.OncologySTAT.com, ;www.oncologystat.com that gives doctors free access to the latest articles from 100 of its own pricey medical journals and that plans to sell advertisements against the content.'' In exchange for personal information, oncologists can rec

0 Comments

Korean crackdown on research

By | September 10, 2007

South Korean universities are apparently cracking down on research fraud following the admission by several high-profile Korean scientists (led by linkurl:Woo Suk Hwang;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22933/ at Seoul National University) that they fabricated findings that they derived embryonic stem cells from cloned human embryos. linkurl:According to;http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/tech/tech_view.asp?newsIdx=9907&categoryCode=133 The Korean Times, 96 public and private Korean l

2 Comments

UK identifies foot and mouth source

By | September 10, 2007

The UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE) on Friday released the findings of its investigation on the source of linkurl:last month's;https://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53473/ foot and mouth disease outbreak that had been traced to three neighboring labs in Pirbright, Surrey, which worked with the virus. As we linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53474/ at the time, original speculations faulted the site's drainage system, which, overwhelmed by heavy rains, could ha

0 Comments

UNH makes offer to banned professor

By | September 10, 2007

The University of New Hampshire sent a letter Friday (September 7) to the banned chair of the biochemistry and molecular biology department, saying that he can be reinstated but no longer as the chair of the department, a faculty member in the department just informed The Scientist. As I linkurl:reported;https://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53383/ in July, John Collins, who has been chair of the department for two years, was banned from campus on June 29, a day after kicking a trash can, y

3 Comments

Officials release pygmy rabbit recovery plan

By | September 8, 2007

The US Fish and Wildlife Service has released a draft recovery plan for the endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, a subject I linkurl:wrote about;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53232/ in our June issue. The tiny rabbits -- on average, adults weigh just 400 grams and are only 25 centimeters long -- have been on the Federal endangered species list since 2001. That year, officials were only able to scoop up 30 of them when they searched throughout their native habitat of the Great B

0 Comments

Endangered wolves don't need passports

By | September 7, 2007

As Federal agencies and farmers call for removing the linkurl:gray wolf;http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/mammals/wolf/ from the US endangered species list, a member of a species appears to have killed a calf in rural linkurl:Stevens County, Washington.;http://www.co.stevens.wa.us/Misc/about.htm; According to a US Fish and Wildlife Service press release, the kill ''appears to be the first confirmed wolf depredation on livestock in Washington State.'' The kill, which happened sometime

0 Comments

More money for Calif. stem cell research

By | September 7, 2007

A bit of good news for California's stem cell researchers who have watched as the linkurl:California Institute for Regenerative Medicine;https://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22768/ has weathered some linkurl:changes;https://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53548/ lately: California officials announced this week that $250 million in taxable general obligation bonds will be sold on September 27 with the proceeds going to CIRM, the regulatory body that oversees the state's stem cell resear

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  3. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  4. Insects’ Neural Learning and Memory Center Discovered in Crustaceans