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image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By Jenny Rood | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

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image: Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

By Elizabeth Stegemöller | March 1, 2017

The principles of neuroplasticity may underlie the positive effects of music therapy in treating a diversity of diseases.

4 Comments

image: Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds

Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds

By Bob Grant | March 1, 2017

Some bat vocalizations resemble bird songs, though at higher frequencies, and as researchers unveil the behaviors’ neural underpinnings, the similarities may run even deeper.

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image: Researchers Study Rodent Songs They Can’t Hear

Researchers Study Rodent Songs They Can’t Hear

By Joshua A. Krisch | March 1, 2017

Mice and rats produce ultrasonic signals to attract mates.

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image: Untangling the Social Webs in Frog Choruses

Untangling the Social Webs in Frog Choruses

By Tracy Vence | March 1, 2017

Frogs and other anurans call to attract mates, and individuals must strive for their voices to be heard in the crowd.

2 Comments

image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By Kate Yandell | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By Kerry Grens | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By Jef Akst | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

2 Comments

image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By Kerry Grens | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

6 Comments

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