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image: Nanoscale Defenses

Nanoscale Defenses

By Edward D. Marks and Steven Smith | May 1, 2016

Coating hospital surfaces, surgical equipment, patient implants, and water-delivery systems with nanoscale patterns and particles could curb the rise of hospital-acquired infections.

3 Comments

image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By Bob Grant | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: A Different Way of Doing Things

A Different Way of Doing Things

By Kivanç Birsoy and David M. Sabatini | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By Kate Yandell | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By Lance L. Munn and Rakesh K. Jain | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

0 Comments

image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By Kerry Grens | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

0 Comments

image: Sleep’s Kernel

Sleep’s Kernel

By James M. Krueger and Sandip Roy | March 1, 2016

Surprisingly small sections of brain, and even neuronal and glial networks in a dish, display many electrical indicators of sleep.

1 Comment

image: Who Sleeps?

Who Sleeps?

By Jerome Siegel and The Scientist Staff | March 1, 2016

Once believed to be unique to birds and mammals, sleep is found across the metazoan kingdom. Some animals, it seems, can’t live without it, though no one knows exactly why.

5 Comments

image: Antibody Alternatives

Antibody Alternatives

By Jane McLeod and Paul Ko Ferrigno | February 1, 2016

Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

2 Comments

image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By Amanda B. Keener | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

1 Comment

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