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image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By George Klein | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By Ruth Williams | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

1 Comment

image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By Christopher S. Sullivan | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

3 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By Eugene V. Koonin and Mart Krupovic | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By Daniel Cossins | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By Eufemia S. Putortì and Massimo P. Crippa | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

1 Comment

image: Tactical Maneuvers

Tactical Maneuvers

By Stephanie Swift | June 1, 2014

Scientists are creating viruses that naturally home in on tumor cells while simultaneously boosting the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

2 Comments

image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By Jamie Green and Charlotte Ariyan | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By Jonathan Slack | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

3 Comments

image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By Randal Halfmann | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

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