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image: A Different Way of Doing Things

A Different Way of Doing Things

By Kivanç Birsoy and David M. Sabatini | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

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image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By Lance L. Munn and Rakesh K. Jain | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By Amanda B. Keener | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By Elie Dolgin | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.

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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By Stephen D. Hursting, Ciara H. O’Flanagan, and Laura W. Bowers | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

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image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By Kerry Grens | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By Elena E. Giorgi | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By George Klein | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By Daniel Cossins | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By Eufemia S. Putortì and Massimo P. Crippa | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

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