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image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By Bob Grant | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

7 Comments

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By Daniel Cossins | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

0 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By Cristina Luiggi | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By Fred Adler | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By Cristina Luiggi | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

4 Comments

image: Icing Organs

Icing Organs

By Megan Scudellari | February 1, 2013

Why scientists are so near and yet so far from being able to cryopreserve organs

6 Comments

image: Steal My Sunshine

Steal My Sunshine

By David Smith | January 1, 2013

How photosynthetic organisms get taken up, passed around, and discarded throughout the eukaryotic domain

6 Comments

image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By Kevin V. Morris | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

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