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image: Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

By | October 1, 2016

Since their introduction to the lab, pluripotent stem cells have gone from research tool to therapeutic, but the journey has been rocky.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By and | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Do the portions of our genomes that set us apart from other animals hold the secret to human evolution?

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image: The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

By | August 1, 2016

As researchers sequence the DNA of thousands of kids with autism, dozens of genetic subgroups are emerging.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Noncoding RNAs Not So Noncoding

Noncoding RNAs Not So Noncoding

By | June 1, 2016

Bits of the transcriptome once believed to function as RNA molecules are in fact translated into small proteins.

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image: Synthetic Biology Comes into Its Own

Synthetic Biology Comes into Its Own

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers create novel genetic circuits that give insight into, and are inspired by, nature.

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