Special Issue Feature

» techniques, DNA sequencing and cancer

Most Recent

image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

1 Comment

image: A Different Way of Doing Things

A Different Way of Doing Things

By | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

0 Comments

image: A Small Revolution

A Small Revolution

By | October 1, 2011

In fewer than 15 years, nanomedicine has gone from fantasy to reality.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Synthesizing Life

Opinion: Synthesizing Life

By | October 1, 2011

Designing genomes from scratch will be the next revolution in biology.

12 Comments

image: Opinion: Thinking Outside the Genome

Opinion: Thinking Outside the Genome

By | October 1, 2011

By extending its reach beyond science, the field of omics will change the way we live our lives.

6 Comments

image: Data Deluge

Data Deluge

By | October 1, 2011

Large-scale data collection and analysis have fundamentally altered the process and mind-set of biological research.

15 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods
  2. Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College London
  3. Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
  4. How Do Infant Immune Systems Learn to Tolerate Gut Bacteria?
AAAS