Editorial

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image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

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image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

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image: Your Brain on Art

Your Brain on Art

By | May 1, 2014

A new scientific discipline investigates the neurology underlying the experience and the creation of beauty.

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image: Search and Destroy

Search and Destroy

By | April 1, 2014

Turning a patient’s immune cells into cancer-fighting weapons

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image: Let There Be Life

Let There Be Life

By | March 1, 2014

How did Earth become biological?

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image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain

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image: Stranger than Fiction

Stranger than Fiction

By | January 1, 2014

Plant biology: You can't make this stuff up.

1 Comment

image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

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image: Exploring the Neuron Forest

Exploring the Neuron Forest

By | November 1, 2013

Innovations in imaging techniques and genetic sequencing take neuroscience to a new level.

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image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

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