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Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By Mary Bates | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By Steve Graff | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By Catherine Offord | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By Diana Kwon | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By Ben Andrew Henry | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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