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Waste-Management Consultant

By | November 1, 2013

By audaciously pursuing an abandoned area of research, Ana María Cuervo discovered how cells selectively break down their waste, and revealed the health consequences when that process malfunctions.

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image: An Olfaction Odyssey

An Olfaction Odyssey

By | October 1, 2013

Thanks to a book, a war, and a big green caterpillar, John Hildebrand found himself mapping the exquisite and surprising wiring of the insect olfactory system.

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Coastal Command

By | September 1, 2013

From a tiny marine research center on the Louisiana coast, Nancy Rabalais has led the charge to map, understand, and reduce dangerous “dead zones” in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Master of Fate

By | July 1, 2013

While tracing the tricky and sometimes surprising paths of multipotent cells in the skin, mammary gland, and heart, Cédric Blanpain has repeatedly turned the stem cell field on its head.  

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The Organist

By | May 1, 2013

When molecular biology methods failed her, Sangeeta Bhatia turned to engineering and microfabrication to build a liver from scratch.

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Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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Going Boldly Forth

By | January 1, 2013

Gregory Hannon believes in taking risks—an approach that’s enabled him to make exciting new discoveries in the world of small RNAs.

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Fly Guy

By | August 1, 2012

For Michael Dickinson, Drosophila are more than winged gene holders—they’re sophisticated systems for translating sensory information into flight instructions.

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Burgers and Flies

By | May 1, 2012

Inspired by Darwin, Mohamed Noor has uncovered the molecular dance by which a single species becomes two.

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High-Tech Choir Master

By | January 1, 2012

Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.

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