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image: Up, Up, and Array

Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Going Boldly Forth

Going Boldly Forth

By | January 1, 2013

Gregory Hannon believes in taking risks—an approach that’s enabled him to make exciting new discoveries in the world of small RNAs.

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image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By | December 1, 2012

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every cancer—a finding he’s helping bring to the clinic.

5 Comments

image: The Road Less Traveled

The Road Less Traveled

By | November 1, 2012

First, Aravinda Chakravarti drew a map of how scientists might unravel the genetics of complex disease. Then he blazed the trail.

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image: (Re)Programming Director

(Re)Programming Director

By | October 1, 2012

Unwilling to accept the finality of terminal differentiation, Helen Blau has honed techniques that showcase the flexibility of cells to adopt different identities.

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image: Sweet Smell of Success

Sweet Smell of Success

By | July 1, 2012

With persistence and pluck, Leslie Vosshall managed to snatch insect odorant receptors from the jaws of experimental defeat.

2 Comments

image: Burgers and Flies

Burgers and Flies

By | May 1, 2012

Inspired by Darwin, Mohamed Noor has uncovered the molecular dance by which a single species becomes two.

10 Comments

image: Truth and Beauty

Truth and Beauty

By | April 1, 2012

With strong foundations in both art and science, Ahna Skop has been able to capture the marvel of—and mechanisms behind—cytokinesis.

4 Comments

image: High-Tech Choir Master

High-Tech Choir Master

By | January 1, 2012

Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.

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