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The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher’s work will help predict how the Arctic is responding to climate change—and the global effects of those changes.

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

By | April 1, 2017

At the University of California, Santa Cruz, the researcher combs the cancer genome, looking for weaknesses.

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image: Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

By | January 1, 2017

The University of Alabama, Birmingham, researcher seeks the neural roots of animal behavior

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image: Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

By | August 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Age: 34

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Member, Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Age: 43

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Instructor, Department of Systems Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Age: 38

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image: Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston. Age: 35

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image: Haley Oliver: Master of Meat

Haley Oliver: Master of Meat

By | June 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, Purdue University, Age: 32

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image: Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

By | March 1, 2014

Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, University College London. Age: 32

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