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A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.

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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

By | July 17, 2017

The memory of a temperature spike can persist for as many as 14 generations in C. elegans.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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