Critic at Large

» culture, ecology, opinion and policy

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image: The Great Divide

The Great Divide

By | December 1, 2013

A two-way bridge between science and policy is desperately needed.

2 Comments

image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Researchers, Hire Hackers

Researchers, Hire Hackers

By | May 1, 2013

Clinical researchers need programming support to streamline their work, minimize error in the data, and find new trends that can point to better treatments.

0 Comments

image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

5 Comments

image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

2 Comments

image: Variety Is the Spice of Life

Variety Is the Spice of Life

By | February 1, 2013

True understanding of the complexity of biological systems demands an assortment of model systems.

2 Comments

image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

1 Comment

image: Military Mind Wars

Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

0 Comments

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