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image: Singularly Alluring

Singularly Alluring

By | June 1, 2014

Microfluidic tools and techniques for investigating cells, one by one

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: Gene Silencing Is Golden

Gene Silencing Is Golden

By | August 1, 2013

A beginner’s how-to on RNAi screening in mammalian cells

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Name That Metabolite!

By | July 1, 2013

A guided tour through the metabolome

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image: Suited to a T

Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

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image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

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Hit Parade

By | December 1, 2012

Cell-based assays are popular for high-throughput screens, where they strike a balance between ease of use and similarity to the human body that researchers aim to treat.

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image: A Guide to the Epigenome

A Guide to the Epigenome

By | November 1, 2012

Making sense of the data deluge

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