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image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

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image: Enter the Third Dimension

Enter the Third Dimension

By | September 1, 2012

Cell culture goes 3-D with devices that better mimic in vivo conditions.

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image: Stemming the Toxic Tide

Stemming the Toxic Tide

By | September 1, 2012

How to screen for toxicity using stem cells

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image: A Little Help from My Friends

A Little Help from My Friends

By | July 1, 2012

How to get the most out of your collaboration with bioinformaticians

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image: Move Over, Mother Nature

Move Over, Mother Nature

By | July 1, 2012

Synthetic biologists harness software to design genes and networks.

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image: Combing the Cancer Genome

Combing the Cancer Genome

By | March 1, 2012

A guided tour through the main online resources for analyzing cancer genomics data

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image: Speak, RNA

Speak, RNA

By | September 1, 2011

A trip through the transcriptome

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image: Sequence Analysis 101

Sequence Analysis 101

By | March 1, 2011

A newbie’s guide to crunching next-generation sequencing data

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