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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Ecotourism’s Promise and Peril</em>

Book Excerpt from Ecotourism’s Promise and Peril

By Daniel T. Blumstein, Benjamin Geffroy, Diogo S.M. Samia, and Eduardo Bessa | August 11, 2017

In the introduction to the book, its editors lay out the case for taking a serious, and mechanistic, look at how visiting natural places for pleasure affects ecology and animal behavior.

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image: Ecotourism: Biological Benefit or Bane?

Ecotourism: Biological Benefit or Bane?

By Daniel T. Blumstein, Benjamin Geffroy, Diogo S.M. Samia, and Eduardo Bessa | August 4, 2017

As nature-based tourism becomes more popular, considering the ecological effects of the practice becomes paramount.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By Bill Schutt | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: The Neanderthal in the Mirror

The Neanderthal in the Mirror

By Lydia Pyne | August 1, 2016

Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By J.D. Trout | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.

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