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In Chapter 8, "The Conspiratorial Move and the Struggle for Evidence-Based Medicine," author Nicoli Natrass explores the Internet's role in the rise of anti-science sentiment.

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image: The Specter of Denialism

The Specter of Denialism

By | March 1, 2012

Conspiracy theories surrounding the global HIV/AIDS epidemic have cost thousands of lives. But science is fighting back.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Pathological Altruism</em>

Book Excerpt from Pathological Altruism

By | February 1, 2012

In Chapter 1, editors Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath introduce the concept of well-intentioned behaviors that go awry.

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image: Killing with Kindness

Killing with Kindness

By | February 1, 2012

Studying the evolution of altruistic behaviors reveals how knee-jerk good intentions can backfire.

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In Chapter 8, "Pirates at the Picnic," author Marlene Zuk considers the wisdom of describing the behavior of ants in human terms

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image: Anthropomorphism: A Peculiar Institution

Anthropomorphism: A Peculiar Institution

By | January 1, 2012

Should we rethink the parallel drawn between “slave-making” ants and human slavery, and other such oversimplifications of animal behavior?

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In an essay entitled "Molecular Cut and Paste: The New Generation of Biological Tools," virologist William McEwan envisions a future where viruses are reprogrammed to become the workhorses of science and medicine.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | October 1, 2011

The promise of viruses as biotech tools will help molecular biology fulfill its true potential.

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image: A Scar Nobly Got

A Scar Nobly Got

By | July 1, 2011

The story of the US government’s efforts to stamp out smallpox in the early 20th century offers insights into the science and practice of mass vaccination.

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image: Book excerpt from <em>Pox: An American History</em>

Book excerpt from Pox: An American History

By | July 1, 2011

In Chapter 5, "The Stable and the Laboratory," author Michael Willrich explores the burgeoning vaccine manufacture industry that ramped up to combat smallpox epidemics in turn-of-the-twentieth-century American cities.

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