Foundations

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"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By Dan Cossins | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

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image: A Sea Dragon Revealed, 1823

A Sea Dragon Revealed, 1823

By Dan Cossins | March 1, 2013

A sharp-eyed fossil prospector and self-taught paleontologist, Mary Anning discovered several extraordinary Mesozoic marine reptiles.

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By Dan Cossins | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By Dan Cossins | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

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image: The Look of Emotion, circa 1868

The Look of Emotion, circa 1868

By Beth Marie Mole | December 1, 2012

Researchers at Cambridge recreate an experiment first performed by Charles Darwin to understand how humans interpret facial expressions.

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image: Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

By Beth Marie Mole | November 1, 2012

On the bicentennial of his birth, Edward Lear is celebrated for his whimsical poetry and his stunningly accurate scientific illustrations.

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By Hayley Dunning | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Life on the Ocean Floor, 1977

Life on the Ocean Floor, 1977

By Cristina Luiggi | September 1, 2012

The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift revealed a biological Garden of Eden.

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image: Painting the Protein Atomic, 1961

Painting the Protein Atomic, 1961

By Sabrina Richards | August 1, 2012

Irving Geis’s revolutionary painting of sperm whale myoglobin illuminated the nascent field of protein structure.

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By Sabrina Richards | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

2 Comments

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