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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

By | October 1, 2017

French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat took on many roles over the course of his life, including physician and scientist.

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image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.

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image: Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

By | July 17, 2017

Activists demanded greater access to and involvement in clinical research for AIDS treatments—and their protests were heard.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

The Leprosy Bacillus, circa 1873

By | October 1, 2013

A scientist’s desperate attempts to prove that Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy landed him on trial, but his insights into the disease’s pathology were eventually vindicated.

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image: Sketching out Cell Theory, circa 1837

Sketching out Cell Theory, circa 1837

By | August 1, 2013

How a dinner-table conversation between two biologists led to the formulation of the theory that cells are the building blocks of all living organisms.

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image: Flying Frog, 1855

Flying Frog, 1855

By | May 1, 2013

Alfred Russel Wallace, Darwin’s unheralded codiscoverer of the theory of evolution by natural selection, found inspiration in the specimens he collected on his travels.

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image:

"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

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  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
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    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

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