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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By Cristina Luiggi | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

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Before the Genes Jumped, 1930s

By Sabrina Richards | January 1, 2012

How Nobel Laureate Barbara McClintock nearly gave up genetics for meteorology

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image: The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

The Hyena Den, discovered 1821

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2011

A 19th century geologist and minister investigates a prehistoric cave full of hyena bones in his native England.

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image: <em>The Scientist,</em> Inaugural Issue, 1986

The Scientist, Inaugural Issue, 1986

By Jef Akst | October 1, 2011

Twenty-five years later, the magazine is still hitting many of the same key discussion points of science.

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image: The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

By Walter F. Bodmer | October 1, 2011

An early advocate of the sequencing of the human genome reflects on his own predictions from 1986.

3 Comments

image: Animal Electricity, circa 1781

Animal Electricity, circa 1781

By Jessica P. Johnson | September 28, 2011

How an Italian scientist doing Frankenstein-like experiments on dead frogs discovered that the body is powered by electrical impulses.

3 Comments

image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By Hannah Waters | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

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image: The First X-ray, 1895

The First X-ray, 1895

By Hannah Waters | July 1, 2011

The discovery of a new and mysterious form of radiation in the late 19th century led to a revolution in medical imaging.

4 Comments

image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By Cristina Luiggi | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

image: Medical Posters, circa 1920

Medical Posters, circa 1920

By Edyta Zielinska | May 25, 2011

William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. 

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