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image: In Situ Hybridization Explained

In Situ Hybridization Explained

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2017

Profilee Joseph Gall of the Carnegie Institute describes the process, which he developed in the 1960s.

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image: Whipping Boys

Whipping Boys

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2017

See whip spiders use their curious antenniform legs to spar in the lab.

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image: Introducing Batman

Introducing Batman

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2017

Daniel Kish, who is blind, uses vocal clicks to navigate the world by echolocation.

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By The Scientist Staff | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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image: “Celldance” Selections

“Celldance” Selections

By The Scientist Staff | December 5, 2016

Highlights from the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2016 video grant competition

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image: Video: Cells, Skin Deep

Video: Cells, Skin Deep

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2016

Profilee Satyajit Mayor discusses his explorations of cell membranes, which are helping to update the classical fluid mosaic model of dynamic cellular boundaries.

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image: Hunting with Sharks

Hunting with Sharks

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2016

Watch scenes from research at the University of South Florida's Mote Marine Laboratory, where scientists saw what happened when they knocked out sharks' electroreception.

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image: Mag-Neato!

Mag-Neato!

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2016

Scientists are unraveling how animals use Earth's magnetic field to navigate.

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image: Seeing Heat

Seeing Heat

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2016

Learn how some snakes sense infrared radiation using specialized sense organs in their faces.

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image: Fuchs on the Future

Fuchs on the Future

By The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2016

Rockefeller University researcher Elaine Fuchs on being a woman in science and her contributions to the burgeoning field of reverse genetics

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