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image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By Cristina Luiggi | June 1, 2012

InĀ 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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image: Spot the Moth

Spot the Moth

By Cristina Luiggi | May 1, 2012

It’s a well-known story: The peppered moth’s ancestral typica phenotype is white with dark speckles. 

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image: Best Places for Postdocs, 2012

Best Places for Postdocs, 2012

By Sabrina Richards | April 1, 2012

Postdocs at this year’s top-ranked institutions get to tackle human health and disease from every angle. 

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image: BeetleCam, Take Two

BeetleCam, Take Two

By Cristina Luiggi | March 15, 2012

The BeetleCam is back! And this time, it’s lion proof. 

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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By Cristina Luiggi | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

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image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By Cristina Luiggi | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: The View From Above

The View From Above

By Cristina Luiggi | February 1, 2012

Satellite imagery is giving biologists a whole new perspective on the phenomena they study.

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image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 

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image: Newly Discovered Species

Newly Discovered Species

By N/A | October 1, 2011

Life on Earth is mind-bogglingly diverse with estimates of the number of existing species in the tens of millions. Over the last 4 billion years, many species have gone extinct; and because of the actions of humans, many existing species are now endangered.

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image: Early Bird Plumage

Early Bird Plumage

By Cristina Luiggi | September 15, 2011

After rummaging through thousands of amber inclusions housed at the University of Alberta and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Canada, researchers discovered 11 amber encased-feather fossils that provide the most detailed picture yet of early feather evolution.

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