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image: Bug Fest 2011

Bug Fest 2011

By Edyta Zielinska | August 25, 2011

Earlier this month (August 13-14) thousands of children and bug-loving adults descended on the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, where all manner of insect—dead, alive, and deep fried—were on display to be looked at, touched and, yes...eaten.

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image: Repainting Ancient Birds

Repainting Ancient Birds

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2011

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.

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image: Best in Academia, 2011

Best in Academia, 2011

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2011

Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 

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image: Fish fear from above

Fish fear from above

By Cristina Luiggi | June 15, 2011

Coral reefs are fraught with danger for herbivores such as damselfish and tangs. Venturing out from the safety of the reef’s colorful cracks and crevices to feed means risking being devoured by predators that patrol the warm waters. 

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image: Medical Posters

Medical Posters

By Edyta Zielinska | June 7, 2011

William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. Over his 30-year career with the company, Helfand amassed thousands of posters and other old marketing paraphernalia.

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Inside the mind of Fritz Kahn

By Cristina Luiggi | February 1, 2011

For more than 40 years, German gynecologist and legendary science writer Fritz Kahn (1888-1968) captured the imagination of an international audience with hundreds of wildly inventive illustrations and more than a dozen popular science books. 

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