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image: Bottom Dwellers

Bottom Dwellers

By | September 1, 2012

See some of the images brought up from early trips to the Galápagos Rift, where an ecosystem thrives around hydrothermal vents.

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image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

InĀ 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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image: A Whiff of TB

A Whiff of TB

By | March 1, 2012

Chemical ecologist Max Suckling at the Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., and summer student Rachael Sagar use Pavlovian conditioning to train bees to stick out their tongues, or proboscises, at the scent of odors produced by tuberculosis-causing bacteria.

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image: Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

Electron Microscopy Through the Ages

By | March 1, 2012

Take a tour through the revolutionary menthod's past, present, and future.

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image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: The View From Above

The View From Above

By | February 1, 2012

Satellite imagery is giving biologists a whole new perspective on the phenomena they study.

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image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 

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image: Bat Hunt

Bat Hunt

By | January 1, 2012

Bucknell University mammalogist DeeAnn Reeder raises nets high into the darkened forest canopies of South Sudan to catch bats.

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image: Nari's Shark Bite

Nari's Shark Bite

By | December 1, 2011

In February 2009, a bottlenose dolphin named Nari swam up to the Tangalooma Wild Dolphin Resort on Moreton Island off Australia’s Queensland. 

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image: One-Eyed Shark

One-Eyed Shark

By | October 19, 2011

This is not an ancient one-eyed species, but an animal suffering from a rare congenital condition known as cyclopia, which has been documented in a variety of species, including humans. 

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