Most Recent

image: Mind the Clock

Mind the Clock

By Kerry Grens | September 1, 2013

Many of the body's tissues can tell time, and these peripheral clocks can be influenced by environmental cues, such as the timing of food consumption.

0 Comments

image: The Science of Acupuncture

The Science of Acupuncture

By Helene M. Langevin | May 1, 2013

Research is uncovering connective tissue's role in the benefits of the ancient practice.

3 Comments

image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By Savraj S. Grewal | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

0 Comments

image: Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

By Oksana Kaidanovich-Beilin, Danielle S. Cha, and Roger S. McIntyre | December 6, 2012

Insulin, long recognized as a primary regulator of blood glucose, is now also understood to play key roles in neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, and neurotrophism.

0 Comments

image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By Keith D. Wilkinson and David Fushman | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

0 Comments

image: Ubiquitin basics

Ubiquitin basics

By Keith D. Wilkinson and David Fushman | July 1, 2012

Despite its discovery as a protein that seems to show up everywhere, at least in eukaryotic cells, researchers are only beginning to scratch the surface of all of the cellular functions involving ubiquitin. 

0 Comments

image: Digging the Underground Life

Digging the Underground Life

By Thomas J. Park and Rochelle Buffenstein | June 1, 2012

A rare peek inside the subterranean home of the naked mole-rat

0 Comments

image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By Rodrigo Calado and Neal Young | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

image: Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

By Vern L. Schramm | May 1, 2012

A transition-state mimic has the power to bind an enzyme at its tipping point as strongly as any available inhibitor and more strongly than most, preventing enzymatic activity. 

0 Comments

image: Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

By Amy Maxmen | March 1, 2012

Vitamin D has a variety of actions in the body. It binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which then binds to the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and activates the expression of numerous genes. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Prominent Salk Institute Scientist Inder Verma Resigns
  2. Anheuser-Busch Won’t Fund Controversial NIH Alcohol Study
  3. Dartmouth Professor Investigated for Sexual Misconduct Retires
  4. North American Universities Increasingly Cancel Publisher Packages