Loading...

Most Recent

The neuronal coverings that mediate synaptic changes are involved in everything from memory to psychiatric disorders, affecting autism, Alzheimer’s, and addiction.

0 Comments

New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

1 Comment

From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

5 Comments

image: Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

By Daniel H. Lin and André Hoelz | December 1, 2016

Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.

1 Comment

image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

1 Comment

image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By Uwe Proske and Simon Gandevia | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

0 Comments

image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By Claire Asher and Seirian Sumner | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

8 Comments

image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By Bob Grant | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

7 Comments

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By Cristina Luiggi | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Estonia Offers Free Genetic Testing to Residents
  2. Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains
  3. The Second March for Science a Smaller Affair
  4. RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea Pigs