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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

By Daniel H. Lin and André Hoelz | December 1, 2016

Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By Uwe Proske and Simon Gandevia | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

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image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By Cristina Luiggi | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

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image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By Justin Odegaard and Ajay Chawla | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By Anna Ajduk and Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

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image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By Kevin V. Morris | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

image: Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

By Manel Esteller | March 1, 2011

The study of how covalent marks on DNA and histones are involved in the origin and spread of cancer cells is also leading to new therapeutic strategies.

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