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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

No two neurons are alike. What does that mean for brain function?

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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image: Ghosts in the Genome

Ghosts in the Genome

By Oliver J. Rando | December 1, 2015

How one generation’s experience can affect the next

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image: Outbreak Observatory

Outbreak Observatory

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | July 1, 2015

Increasingly precise remote-sensing data are helping researchers monitor and predict cases of infectious disease.

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image: Hidden Menace

Hidden Menace

By Genevieve Martin, Matthew Pace, and John Frater | May 1, 2015

Curing HIV means finding and eradicating viruses still lurking in the shadows.

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By The Scientist Staff | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By Christopher S. Sullivan | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

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image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By Claire Asher and Seirian Sumner | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

8 Comments

image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By Bob Grant | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

7 Comments

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