Image of the Day

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 30, 2012

The tongue of a Cricket (Gryllus campestris), captured by darkfield and Rheinberg illumination

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 29, 2012

The Psyche (Leptosia nina) butterfly, shown here as a mating pair, is a weak flyer, making erratic movements as it bobs across the grass and rarely leaving ground level.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 26, 2012

Black mastiff bat (Molossus rufus) embryos

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 25, 2012

A male Megachilid bee (Haetosmia vechti) forages in Mevo Horon, West Bank.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 24, 2012

A scanning electron micrograph of the prickly hairs of stinging nettle

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 23, 2012

A fluorescence micrograph catches a neuron regenerating in culture.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 22, 2012

HeLa cells with their golgi tagged with fluorescent protein (yellow)

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 19, 2012

Instead of a thumb, the rare, Japanese Otton frog has a sharp spike, which it uses for combat and mating.

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 18, 2012

A 100 million year-old spider attack, preserved in amber

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image: Image of the Day

Image of the Day

By | October 17, 2012

A colorized light micrograph of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans colonies, which cause common mouth infections

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