Image of the Day

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Coral on Acid

Image of the Day: Coral on Acid

By The Scientist Staff | March 16, 2018

Researchers exposed a coral reef to carbonated water to study the effects of ocean acidification.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Bat Attack!

Image of the Day: Bat Attack!

By The Scientist Staff | March 15, 2018

Barbastelle bats trick moths with muffled echolocation calls.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Pterosaur Fossils

Image of the Day: Pterosaur Fossils

By The Scientist Staff | March 14, 2018

Paleontologists find fossils from at least seven species of the flying reptiles in Morocco.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Aging Brain Cells

Image of the Day: Aging Brain Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 13, 2018

Scientists identified a gene involved in the age-related deterioration of mouse neural stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Soaring Manta Rays

Image of the Day: Soaring Manta Rays

By The Scientist Staff | March 12, 2018

The colossal fish bank like airplanes when turning.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Glowing Larva

Image of the Day: Glowing Larva

By The Scientist Staff | March 9, 2018

Researchers identified a gene in mosquitoes that moderates their susceptibility to malaria parasite infection. 

2 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Living Color

Image of the Day: Living Color

By The Scientist Staff | March 8, 2018

Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers

Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers

By The Scientist Staff | March 7, 2018

Researchers created a nanofibrous scaffold to see how it supports cell growth.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Mosquito Brain

Image of the Day: Mosquito Brain

By The Scientist Staff | March 6, 2018

Researchers have constructed the first neuroanatomy atlas of a female mosquito’s brain.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Moth Proboscis

Image of the Day: Moth Proboscis

By The Scientist Staff | March 5, 2018

The hawkmoth’s brain uses a different area to search for food than it does to look for where to lay eggs.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be Preventable
  4. Opinion: Should Human-Animal Chimeras Be Granted “Personhood”?