Image of the Day

» brain, neuroimaging and imaging

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image: Image of the Day: Actin Burst

Image of the Day: Actin Burst

By | December 6, 2017

Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Dance 

Image of the Day: Cell Dance 

By | November 24, 2017

Scientists develop a micropatterning device to study cell behavior. 

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image: Image of the Day: Red Alert

Image of the Day: Red Alert

By | November 9, 2017

Researchers unveil the neural basis of alertness in larval zebrafish.   

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image: Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

By | November 8, 2017

Scientists have developed a computer tomography device capable of visualizing objects at nanoscale. 

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile X

Image of the Day: Fragile X

By | November 7, 2017

Researchers uncover the central role of a protein linked to Fragile X Syndrome in mice, one of the leading causes of autism and intellectual disability.

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image: Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram

Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram

By | November 5, 2017

Optical engineers have developed a portable field microscope that could aid the diagnosis of diseased cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Image of the Day: Neurons Unveiled

Image of the Day: Neurons Unveiled

By | November 2, 2017

Researchers have succeeded in mapping the complex paths of 300 neurons in the mouse brain.

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image: Image of the Day: Fish Eye Lens

Image of the Day: Fish Eye Lens

By | November 1, 2017

Researchers develop a new method to highlight specific cells that reside in the lens of a zebrafish.

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image: Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

Image of the Day: Painting with Viruses

By | October 31, 2017

Researchers have used a modified rabies virus and fluorescent proteins to tag individual nerve cells in the mouse visual cortex. 

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