Image of the Day

» imaging and physiology

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Cell Dance 

Image of the Day: Cell Dance 

By | November 24, 2017

Scientists develop a micropatterning device to study cell behavior. 

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

By | November 8, 2017

Scientists have developed a computer tomography device capable of visualizing objects at nanoscale. 

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram

Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram

By | November 5, 2017

Optical engineers have developed a portable field microscope that could aid the diagnosis of diseased cells.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Neurons Unveiled

Image of the Day: Neurons Unveiled

By | November 2, 2017

Researchers have succeeded in mapping the complex paths of 300 neurons in the mouse brain.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Seeing in 5-D

Image of the Day: Seeing in 5-D

By | January 17, 2017

A new imaging technique helps scientists see the interactions between molecules in this zebrafish embryo.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Cerebral Infiltration

Image of the Day: Cerebral Infiltration

By | February 11, 2013

An illustration depicting the damaging effects of a tumor (red) on structural connections within the brain

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Glowing Gut

Image of the Day: Glowing Gut

By | February 8, 2013

A maturing mouse gut nervous system (shown in orange), a mesh-like system of neurons that regulates digestion and gastrointenstial function, runs from the stomach through the intestines.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

RayBiotech