Image of the Day

» imaging, cancer research and E. coli

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image: Image of the Day: Actin Burst

Image of the Day: Actin Burst

By | December 6, 2017

Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Dance 

Image of the Day: Cell Dance 

By | November 24, 2017

Scientists develop a micropatterning device to study cell behavior. 

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image: Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

Image of the Day: Guess Whose Leg  

By | November 8, 2017

Scientists have developed a computer tomography device capable of visualizing objects at nanoscale. 

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image: Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram

Image of the Day: Malaria Hologram

By | November 5, 2017

Optical engineers have developed a portable field microscope that could aid the diagnosis of diseased cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Neurons Unveiled

Image of the Day: Neurons Unveiled

By | November 2, 2017

Researchers have succeeded in mapping the complex paths of 300 neurons in the mouse brain.

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image: Image of the Day: Seeing in 5-D

Image of the Day: Seeing in 5-D

By | January 17, 2017

A new imaging technique helps scientists see the interactions between molecules in this zebrafish embryo.

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image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

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image: Image of the Day: Cerebral Infiltration

Image of the Day: Cerebral Infiltration

By | February 11, 2013

An illustration depicting the damaging effects of a tumor (red) on structural connections within the brain

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