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image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By , , and | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.

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image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By , , and | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: After We March

Opinion: After We March

By | March 16, 2017

How to become—and stay—involved in science policy 

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Sometimes, Scientists Must March

Opinion: Sometimes, Scientists Must March

By , , and | February 13, 2017

Lessons learned from the “Death of Evidence” demonstration in Canada

9 Comments

image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.

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image: Opinion: Toot Your Horn

Opinion: Toot Your Horn

By | October 6, 2016

Why (and how) scientists should advocate for their research with journalists and policymakers

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: New Models for ASDs

Opinion: New Models for ASDs

By | May 14, 2015

The study of mini “brains” in a dish, derived from patient cells, offers a novel approach for autism spectrum disorder research.

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image: Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

By | March 23, 2015

Online brain-training is gaining popularity, but so far little evidence exists to support claims of improved cognition.

5 Comments

image: Opinion: How Postdocs Can Participate

Opinion: How Postdocs Can Participate

By | September 18, 2014

Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers should be taking part in discussions on the future of biomedical research.

6 Comments

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