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What we can know about biology before the last universal common ancestor is limited—and we should be circumspect in filling in the gaps.

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image: Opinion: Three-Parent Embryos—A Slippery Slope?

Opinion: Three-Parent Embryos—A Slippery Slope?

By John D. Loike and Alan Kadish | June 14, 2018

The use of pronuclear transfer to treat infertility must first be backed by evidence it can work in cases where parents seek to avoid mitochondrial mutations.

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image: Opinion: How to Use Mobile Apps for Immunohistochemistry

Opinion: How to Use Mobile Apps for Immunohistochemistry

By Alexander E. Kalyuzhny | May 25, 2018

This guide for apps comes from personal experience testing various programs aimed to improve productivity or to help with selecting reagents.

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Determining which products of advanced biotechnology are deserving of legal protections is essential to our own social architecture.

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image: Opinion: We Must Demand Evidence of Peer Review

Opinion: We Must Demand Evidence of Peer Review

By Nikolai Slavov | May 21, 2018

Peer review varies in quality and thoroughness. Making it publicly available could improve it.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: How We Found a New Way to Detect “Hidden Sharks”

Opinion: How We Found a New Way to Detect “Hidden Sharks”

By Stefano Mariani and Judith Bakker | May 7, 2018

Given the speed and efficiency of environmental (eDNA) sampling, a much larger portion of the sea can be screened, in a shorter time, for patterns of diversity.

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image: Opinion: Microbial Mind Control—Truth or Scare?

Opinion: Microbial Mind Control—Truth or Scare?

By Katerina Johnson | May 1, 2018

Normal brain function may have evolved to depend on gut microbes and their metabolites.

4 Comments

Drug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.

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image: Opinion: We Have Been Naive About Naive T Cells

Opinion: We Have Been Naive About Naive T Cells

By Theo van den Broek, José A.M. Borghans, and Femke van Wijk | April 6, 2018

Human naive T cells are far more heterogeneous than has long been appreciated, having implications for vaccine strategies.

2 Comments

Rather, the breast cancer mutation screen was classified as a type of medical device with obligations for the company to reduce risks to customers.

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