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Rather, the breast cancer mutation screen was classified as a type of medical device with obligations for the company to reduce risks to customers.


image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.


image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By Michael P. Milham, Arno Klein, and Cameron Craddock | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.


Scientists are using a powerful gene editing technique to understand how human embryos develop.

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image: Opinion: Get to Know Why People Openly Share Genomic Data

Opinion: Get to Know Why People Openly Share Genomic Data

By Tobias Haeusermann | May 9, 2017

It’s not only about health but also about exploring ancestry and contributing to science.


image: Opinion: Birds of a Feather?

Opinion: Birds of a Feather?

By Geoffrey E. Hill | March 10, 2017

Taking into account the interaction of nuclear and mitochondrial genes in birds holds the promise of more objectively defining what constitutes a species.


image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By Laurence O’Dwyer | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.


image: Opinion: GMOs Are Not “Frankenfoods”

Opinion: GMOs Are Not “Frankenfoods”

By Dov Greenbaum and Mark Gerstein | August 30, 2016

It behooves the scientific community to reflect on the public’s “Franken-” characterization of genetically modified foods.


image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By Andreas Kuersten | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.


image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By Stephan Beck, Stefan H. Stricker, and Anna Köferle | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

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