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image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By Amanda B. Keener | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.


image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By Amanda B. Keener | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.


image: Contributors


By Amanda B. Keener | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By Anna Azvolinsky | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By Sarah C.P. Williams | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.


image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By Mary Beth Aberlin | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.


image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By The Scientist Staff | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.


image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By Amanda B. Keener | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By The Scientist Staff | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.


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