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image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By Ashley P. Taylor | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.


image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.


image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.


image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By Jenny Rood | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By Janice Dietert and Rodney Dietert | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.


image: Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found

Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found

By Kerry Grens | June 24, 2015

Specialized cardiac cells in the mouse heart appear to be the long-sought-after proliferative heart cells.


image: Extra DNA Base Discovered

Extra DNA Base Discovered

By Jef Akst | June 23, 2015

An epigenetic variant of cytosine is stable in the genomes of living mice, suggesting a possible expansion of the DNA alphabet.


image: The Handedness of Cells

The Handedness of Cells

By Kerry Grens | June 17, 2015

Actin—the bones of the cell—has a preference for swirling into a counterclockwise pattern.


image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By Anna Azvolinsky | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By Kerry Grens | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.


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